Andrea Grimes’ heartbreaking but critical report on guns and domestic violence » http://bit.ly/19eNUo5 » We need to share these stories and facts far and wide.
"According to a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Public Health, the risk of homicide against women increases 500 percent when a gun is present in domestic violence situations, and the FBI estimates that in 2010, 64 percent of women murdered with guns were killed by a current or former intimate partner. The Violence Policy Center reports that in 2010, the number of women shot and killed by partners was six times higher than the number killed by strangers using all other weapons combined."

Andrea Grimes’ heartbreaking but critical report on guns and domestic violence » http://bit.ly/19eNUo5 » We need to share these stories and facts far and wide.

"According to a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Public Health, the risk of homicide against women increases 500 percent when a gun is present in domestic violence situations, and the FBI estimates that in 2010, 64 percent of women murdered with guns were killed by a current or former intimate partner. The Violence Policy Center reports that in 2010, the number of women shot and killed by partners was six times higher than the number killed by strangers using all other weapons combined."


In a hearing room on Capitol Hill, an extraordinary thing happened on Tuesday: a real discussion about race, justice, and the nature of prejudice.
The occasion, titled “A Conversation About Race and Justice,” was a hearing called by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi under the aegis of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee at the request of the Congressional Black Caucus in the wake of the exoneration of George Zimmerman
At the meeting, committee co-chair Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) recited well-worn statistics about the over-representation of African Americans among the poor (including 40 percent of African-American children), an unemployment rate nearly double that of the national average, and the much higher rates of convictions for minor drug offenses endured by Black offenders when compared with those for whites. “African Americans make up 15 percent of the nation’s drug users,” she said. “They are 37 percent of those arrested, 59 percent of those convicted, and 74 percent of those sentenced to prison for a drug offense. That is not right.”

Read more—>

In a hearing room on Capitol Hill, an extraordinary thing happened on Tuesday: a real discussion about race, justice, and the nature of prejudice.

The occasion, titled “A Conversation About Race and Justice,” was a hearing called by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi under the aegis of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee at the request of the Congressional Black Caucus in the wake of the exoneration of George Zimmerman

At the meeting, committee co-chair Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) recited well-worn statistics about the over-representation of African Americans among the poor (including 40 percent of African-American children), an unemployment rate nearly double that of the national average, and the much higher rates of convictions for minor drug offenses endured by Black offenders when compared with those for whites. “African Americans make up 15 percent of the nation’s drug users,” she said. “They are 37 percent of those arrested, 59 percent of those convicted, and 74 percent of those sentenced to prison for a drug offense. That is not right.”

Read more—>

**trigger warning: rape, violence against sex workers**

Meagher’s grief stricken husband, Tom, gave a moving television interview in which he further fused the intensely personal and the unavoidably political. With a striking lack of self pity, Tom said he was not asking “Why me?” but “Why anyone?” He pointed out that Bayley’s previous victims were sex workers and decried their treatment by the justice system. He said, “Put it like this: If he’d raped five people like Meagher that many times in that brutal a fashion, I don’t think he would have [only] served eight years in prison.”
He is right. Bayley was attacking and raping sex workers at a time when judges had explicitly said that raping a sex worker was fundamentally different than raping a “chaste woman” because the experiences associated with prostitution mean the prostitute does not endure the same “reaction of revulsion” during forced sex and that the elements of “shame” and “defilement” may be missing or diminished so the circumstance of aggravation is missing.

Sex workers are aware of the discourse that casts them as less worthy, and they know it increases the risk of violence and means less opportunity for redress when it occurs. In Australiaand throughout the world, many sex workers vote with their feet by avoiding reporting assaults for fear of being disbelieved, derided, exposed, or themselves criminalized.

**trigger warning: rape, violence against sex workers**

Meagher’s grief stricken husband, Tom, gave a moving television interview in which he further fused the intensely personal and the unavoidably political. With a striking lack of self pity, Tom said he was not asking “Why me?” but “Why anyone?” He pointed out that Bayley’s previous victims were sex workers and decried their treatment by the justice system. He said, “Put it like this: If he’d raped five people like Meagher that many times in that brutal a fashion, I don’t think he would have [only] served eight years in prison.”

He is right. Bayley was attacking and raping sex workers at a time when judges had explicitly said that raping a sex worker was fundamentally different than raping a “chaste woman” because the experiences associated with prostitution mean the prostitute does not endure the same “reaction of revulsion” during forced sex and that the elements of “shame” and “defilement” may be missing or diminished so the circumstance of aggravation is missing.

Sex workers are aware of the discourse that casts them as less worthy, and they know it increases the risk of violence and means less opportunity for redress when it occurs. In Australiaand throughout the world, many sex workers vote with their feet by avoiding reporting assaults for fear of being disbelieved, derided, exposed, or themselves criminalized.

therealspiderman:

“Transgender people have a 1-in-12 chance of being murdered, compared to the 1-in-18,000 chance faced by average Americans (Human Rights Campaign, 2009).”

just let that sink in for a second.

(via safersex)

Wichita pastor seeks dismissal of stalking petition filed by clinic’s founder

Julie Burkhart, the founder of Trust Women, was earlier granted a temporary stalking order against Mark Holick. The Trust Women Foundation raised money to recently open South Wind Women’s Center, which will offer abortions up to 14 weeks of pregnancy.
Burkhart wrote in her petition that Holick had pointed a sign toward her house Feb. 15 that said, “Where’s your church?’
“My former boss was murdered in his church,” Burkhart said in the petition filed in Sedgwick County District Court.
Burkhart said in an interview with The Eagle that she interpreted the sign to be a threat against her. She had worked for George Tiller, a Wichita doctor who was shot and killed in his church by an anti-abortion activist May 31, 2009. Scott Roeder was convicted of murder in the case and is serving a 50-year sentence.
Burkhart said in her hand-written complaint that Holick was “engaging in behavior meant to scare and intimidate me. He also uses violent language, which I take very seriously.”
Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2013/04/11/2757681/wichita-pastor-seeks-dismissal.html#storylink=cpy

Nothing says #prolife like “Let me stalk you and fear for your life in peace!”

Wichita pastor seeks dismissal of stalking petition filed by clinic’s founder

Julie Burkhart, the founder of Trust Women, was earlier granted a temporary stalking order against Mark Holick. The Trust Women Foundation raised money to recently open South Wind Women’s Center, which will offer abortions up to 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Burkhart wrote in her petition that Holick had pointed a sign toward her house Feb. 15 that said, “Where’s your church?’

“My former boss was murdered in his church,” Burkhart said in the petition filed in Sedgwick County District Court.

Burkhart said in an interview with The Eagle that she interpreted the sign to be a threat against her. She had worked for George Tiller, a Wichita doctor who was shot and killed in his church by an anti-abortion activist May 31, 2009. Scott Roeder was convicted of murder in the case and is serving a 50-year sentence.

Burkhart said in her hand-written complaint that Holick was “engaging in behavior meant to scare and intimidate me. He also uses violent language, which I take very seriously.”


Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2013/04/11/2757681/wichita-pastor-seeks-dismissal.html#storylink=cpy

Nothing says #prolife like “Let me stalk you and fear for your life in peace!”

The root of violence elsewhere is the normalization of violence in an intimate way in the home.

Gloria Steinem in an interview with BBC “Hard Talk” presenter Stephen Sackur. Steinem draws a link between domestic violence and broader national violence, also saying that the root of democracy outside the home is democracy inside the home.” Sackur interjects to display surprise and to counter her by saying that surely Western women, who have democracy in the home would disagree with her about the primacy of this connection. Steinem rebuffs him, and reminds him that in the US, were you to add up all the fatalities from 9/11 and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, that the number of American women killed by their husbands and boyfriends in that same period of time would come out higher.

Via Lauren Wolfe at Women Under Siege.

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

thefeministme:

5 facts about violence against women. VIA TRUST.org

(via smellslikegirlriot)