Wisconsin Democrat Launches Quixotic Effort to Overturn Forced Ultrasound Law 
Rep. Taylor told the Capital Times that she knows her effort is likely to fail, but she said it’s necessary to “stand up for women” against “very extreme” legislation. “We are going to keep at it,” she told the paper. “One day we are going to be successful at repealing this law.”

Wisconsin Democrat Launches Quixotic Effort to Overturn Forced Ultrasound Law

Rep. Taylor told the Capital Times that she knows her effort is likely to fail, but she said it’s necessary to “stand up for women” against “very extreme” legislation. “We are going to keep at it,” she told the paper. “One day we are going to be successful at repealing this law.”

Texas Consolidates its Most Horrifying Anti-Choice Bills Into One Nightmare Piece of Legislation 
Republican Gov. Rick Perry called the 30-day special session this month to address Texas’ redistricting issues, as he and his fellow Republicans fight to prevent the state’s growing minority populations from receiving the democratic representation they’re due; a federal court struck down state and federal district maps drawn in 2011, declaring them discriminatory.
But this week, Perry added a sweeping anti-choice bill to the legislature’s agenda: SB 5, filed by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy), combines the worst of anti-choice legislators’ proposed abortion bills from the regular session into a nightmarish document that would decimate Texans’ access to safe, legal abortion care. If passed in its entirety, SB 5 would:
ban all abortions after 20 weeks, with the exception of those “necessary to avert the death or substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant woman” or if a fetal anomaly “will result in the death of the infant not later than minutes to hours after birth regardless of the provision of lifesaving medical treatment.”
require all abortion-providing doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the procedure is performed.
effectively ban telemedical abortions, requiring doctors to provide the abortion pill (a mifepristol/mifepristone combination) in person and according to outdated 13-year-old Food and Drug Administration regulations that are not only unnecessary, but thought to be potentially harmful in current practice, according to the American College of Gynecologists and the Texas Medical Association.
require all abortion providers to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, which would reduce the number of sites at which a Texan can obtain an abortion to a total of five, located solely in major metropolitan areas.

Texas Consolidates its Most Horrifying Anti-Choice Bills Into One Nightmare Piece of Legislation

Republican Gov. Rick Perry called the 30-day special session this month to address Texas’ redistricting issues, as he and his fellow Republicans fight to prevent the state’s growing minority populations from receiving the democratic representation they’re due; a federal court struck down state and federal district maps drawn in 2011, declaring them discriminatory.

But this week, Perry added a sweeping anti-choice bill to the legislature’s agenda: SB 5, filed by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy), combines the worst of anti-choice legislators’ proposed abortion bills from the regular session into a nightmarish document that would decimate Texans’ access to safe, legal abortion care. If passed in its entirety, SB 5 would:

  • ban all abortions after 20 weeks, with the exception of those “necessary to avert the death or substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant woman” or if a fetal anomaly “will result in the death of the infant not later than minutes to hours after birth regardless of the provision of lifesaving medical treatment.”
  • require all abortion-providing doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the procedure is performed.
  • effectively ban telemedical abortions, requiring doctors to provide the abortion pill (a mifepristol/mifepristone combination) in person and according to outdated 13-year-old Food and Drug Administration regulations that are not only unnecessary, but thought to be potentially harmful in current practice, according to the American College of Gynecologists and the Texas Medical Association.
  • require all abortion providers to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, which would reduce the number of sites at which a Texan can obtain an abortion to a total of five, located solely in major metropolitan areas.
http://t.co/UTKGi7xz
Paul Ryan co-sponsored H.R. 3805, a federal version of legislation passed in Texas and made famous this past spring by Governor Bob McDonnell of Virginia, that would force a woman to undergo a medically unnecessary ultrasound procedure regardless of whether they want it or their doctor deems it necessary.
Paul Ryan also co-sponsored H.R. 212, a federal version of so-called “personhood” legislation, that would declare legal personhood at the moment of conception, thus outlawing all abortion and possibly hormonal contraception. Even Mississippi defeated this legislation 58-42 last year on statewide ballot. Extreme egg-as-person legislation has been defeated in many of the most conservative states in the country and never been made law.

http://t.co/UTKGi7xz

Paul Ryan co-sponsored H.R. 3805, a federal version of legislation passed in Texas and made famous this past spring by Governor Bob McDonnell of Virginia, that would force a woman to undergo a medically unnecessary ultrasound procedure regardless of whether they want it or their doctor deems it necessary.

Paul Ryan also co-sponsored H.R. 212, a federal version of so-called “personhood” legislation, that would declare legal personhood at the moment of conception, thus outlawing all abortion and possibly hormonal contraception. Even Mississippi defeated this legislation 58-42 last year on statewide ballot. Extreme egg-as-person legislation has been defeated in many of the most conservative states in the country and never been made law.

In Letter, Texas Department of Health Accused by Ten Democratic Legislators of Subverting Democratic Process

Written by Andrea Grimes for RH Reality Check. This diary is cross-posted; commenters wishing to engage directly with the author should do so at the original post.

In opposition to new proposed abortion reporting restrictions in Texas, ten Democratic legislators have sent an open letter to Health and Human Services Executive Commissioner Tom Suehs urging him to not to move forward with the new rules, which would increase the amount of information gathered on abortion-seeking people and require doctors to report vaguely defined “complications” from abortion.

"The proposed rule does not represent the will of the legislative body and, if implemented through rulemaking, would serve to circumvent the legislative process," wrote the legislators.

The new rules are being proposed after anti-choice, Tea Party-endorsed legislator Rep. Bill Zedler and his past colleagues were repeatedly unable to enact them through democratic means in the Texas Legislature over the past several years. Texas health officials have agreed to look into adopting the failed legislation by rule rather than law. In their letter, the Democratic legislators say this sets a “terrible precedent.”

"If this rule is published and adopted, it sets a terrible precedent and will have serious ramifications for years to come," write the legislators.

But Texas health officials seem anxious to appease Zedler, though they are increasingly backtracking on initial openness about cooperating with the legislator.

Read the rest here.

Please have a seat in the Shaming Room, we’ll be right with you.

Please have a seat in the Shaming Room, we’ll be right with you.