When An Obviously Racist ‘Shopping While Black’ Situation is Happening, Who Steps In to Help?

“Shopping While Black” is a faux crime that black people fear committing—along with a whole host of other while-black faux-offenses that are rooted in racism against black people rather than in any real crime or even action—and consists of being black in a store, and thus being treated suspiciously, unwelcomingly, or even hostilely by store staff. Many black people have experienced it at least once in their lives; yet who steps in to help someone being victimized and humiliated by such outright racism in public spaces?

This social experiment, conducted by ABC‘s What Would You Do?, shows the answer to that question in real-life footage. A point to note is that it is not only amazing how few white people step in on the side of justice in this video, but also how surprised the white people that do step in are by racism when it is a fact of life for people of color in America today.

This Off-Duty Cop Proves What Young Women Know About Who’s Really to Blame For Rape

The video takes a petrifying turn at 6:40 when two married men come in. The fact that they encourage the man to rape the woman is bad, but the fact that we later learn (at the 8:00 minute mark) that one of them is an off-duty cop is horrifying. Take a look.

The rapist in this video is not only allowed to rape, he’s encouraged to do it. This is what happens when police officers, the media, or female journalists tell women to stop getting drunk/dressing like sluts to prevent sexual assault. It would be sensible advice if it didn’t reinforce the very structures that make sexual assault not only possible, but probable.

One in five women will be a victim of rape at some point in her life. Women who are between the ages of 16-24, are four times for likely to get raped than any other population group. It doesn’t keep happening because alcohol exists, it keeps happening because men who rape get to joke about it with off-duty cops. If the people who are supposed to be protecting women, buy into rape culture, it’s not surprising that rape remains the most unreported crime.


None of this is to say that OITNB gets it all right in its handling of race, class, and gender. The depictions of Black and Latina women constantly threaten to veer into all too familiar tropes and stereotypes, for example. But OITNB does get a lot right about the conversations people of color and white folks have amongst themselves and with each other, and how different identities and experiences shape those interactions.

None of this is to say that OITNB gets it all right in its handling of race, class, and gender. The depictions of Black and Latina women constantly threaten to veer into all too familiar tropes and stereotypes, for example. But OITNB does get a lot right about the conversations people of color and white folks have amongst themselves and with each other, and how different identities and experiences shape those interactions.

Rick Santorum makes an ignorant claim: that we can trace the fight for gay marriage back to TV’s “Will and Grace.”

therearedemonsinsideofus:

nprfreshair:

Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television

You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.


Chris Hayes is a man after my own heart:
1) Bulls and Cubs fan.2) “I can’t control my gender, race or sexual orientation, I can control who we have on and what voices we introduce to viewers.”3) Talks as fast as I do.4) Policy over pandering5) 
6) His book was really good

therearedemonsinsideofus:

nprfreshair:

Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television

You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.

Chris Hayes is a man after my own heart:

1) Bulls and Cubs fan.
2) “I can’t control my gender, race or sexual orientation, I can control who we have on and what voices we introduce to viewers.”
3) Talks as fast as I do.
4) Policy over pandering
5) 

6) His book was really good

(via breckfastfood)

During a debate between Senator Margaret Sitte & Dr. Kristen Cain about the abortion restriction bills in North Dakota, Sen. Sitte makes a litle slip.

She stumbles and admits that outside interests are behind the unconstitutional abortion bans in the state and are willing to spend MILLIONS OF DOLLARS to make sure that people in North Dakota won’t have the right to an abortion.

Watch when she’s called out on trying to lie her way out of it.

Why Zerlina Maxwell Is Almost Right About Teaching Men Not to Rape
Tara Murtha says

Maxwell is right, of course. The only problem with her argument is that it didn’t go far enough. For men and boys to be taught not to rape, they have to first learn what rape is.

Why Zerlina Maxwell Is Almost Right About Teaching Men Not to Rape

Tara Murtha says

Maxwell is right, of course. The only problem with her argument is that it didn’t go far enough. For men and boys to be taught not to rape, they have to first learn what rape is.

TV has accepted and is willing to acknowledge “non-traditional” families. Why not government?