What Janet Mock Can Teach Us About Womanhood and ‘Realness’

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Redefining Realness may be about one trans woman of color, but it’s a story everyone should read, because the issues she confronts—including identity, poverty, sexual abuse, and self love—are things that are, in one way or another, within our power to change. And for that reason people should be, and seem genuinely interested in, having public conversations about the needs of trans people. 

Read more.

It’s a logic that says that being transgender is a choice, a costume, a scheme put on to dupe cis men. It’s also the same logic at the core of so-called “trans panic“ legal defenses, in which cis men accused of killing trans women have, often successfully, argued in court that they were “provoked” to attack their victims after discovering their biological sex. It’s a warped sense of power cloaked in patriarchy that has dug early graves for women like Gwen Araujo and Angie Zapata, teenagers who were violently killed for being themselves.

Janet Mock, in her new book Redefining Realness.

Her book can teach us a lot. 

How Trans and Intersex Groups Struggle to Make Ends Meet

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“The LGB groups that gain the funding for LGBTI tend to ignore the T/I, or do not know enough about T/I to do constructive work.”

Read more.

theblacksophisticate:

Laverne Cox, Keynote address, Creating Change 2014.

THIS.

Right on, Laverne. 

(via femifeisty)

Schools have a responsibility to create a learning environment that meets and balances the needs of all kids and allows every student to succeed. For transgender students this includes access to all school facilities, programs, and extracurricular activities in a way that is consistent with their gender identity.

 - Jennifer Levi, director of GLAD’s Transgender Rights Project

Read about decision marks the first time a state court has ruled that students must be allowed to use restrooms of the gender with which they identify.

I live an intersectional life. My identity meets at the intersection of oppressions, and yet I find power in resisting that oppression—standing arm in arm with those who believe, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, that “an injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Every time we give in to an oppressive piece of legislation, we allow a lesbian teacher at a Catholic school to get fired. Every time we remain silent as employers force their personal beliefs on their employees, we tell a woman that she has no right to govern her own body. Every time we allow the radical right to chip away at the 14th Amendment’s equal protection clause, we admit that we are “less than.”

When I was coming to terms with my queerness, I was told “it gets better.” I have come to learn that it gets better only when we choose to make it better. After decades of fighting to be able to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps, or by our glitter pumps, it is unacceptable to be fed watered-down legislation posing as liberation. We deserve justice everywhere—and I intend to lift my voice to call on the Senate to deliver it.

—  Kirin Kanakkanatt, ‘Asterisk Equality’ Isn’t Real Equality: Fighting for an ENDA Without Exemptions
Transgender Student Named Homecoming Queen
Cassidy Lynn Campbell had a very emotional night last Friday when she won the popular vote among students and became this year’s homecoming queen at Marina High School in Huntington Beach, California. Campbell is transgender; she has been living her life as a girl for the last three years. She has been very public about her transition, posting frequent YouTube videos that show her putting on make-up and making her own long-haired wig. She told local news channel KTLA that when she won, “I instantly just dropped to the ground and started crying. I realized it wasn’t for me anymore and I was doing this for so many people all around the county and the state and possibly the world and I am so proud to win this not just for me, but everyone out there.”

Transgender Student Named Homecoming Queen

Cassidy Lynn Campbell had a very emotional night last Friday when she won the popular vote among students and became this year’s homecoming queen at Marina High School in Huntington Beach, California. Campbell is transgender; she has been living her life as a girl for the last three years. She has been very public about her transition, posting frequent YouTube videos that show her putting on make-up and making her own long-haired wig. She told local news channel KTLA that when she won, “I instantly just dropped to the ground and started crying. I realized it wasn’t for me anymore and I was doing this for so many people all around the county and the state and possibly the world and I am so proud to win this not just for me, but everyone out there.”

notesofaphoenix:

Just had this exchange on okcupid. Rarely happens.

notesofaphoenix:

Just had this exchange on okcupid. Rarely happens.

(via okcupidvillains)

str-crssd:

"Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle?
It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”
photo from Transgender Support (worldwide) facebook page.

str-crssd:

"Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle?

It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”

photo from Transgender Support (worldwide) facebook page.

(via sexgenderbody)