Stoking Fire: American Life League Escalates Anti-Planned Parenthood Campaign

It’s the anti-Planned Parenthood equivalent of Reefer Madness, covering the themes of birth control and comprehensive sex education. Hitchborn begins, “Just as the goal of a drug dealer is to make drug addicts, the goal of Planned Parenthood is the make sex addicts”—a population of consumers ready to purchase pills, condoms, sex toys, abortions, and whatever other “unnatural” tools are available. He then blasts the illustrated textbook It’s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, and Sexual Health, by Robie H. Harris and Michel Emberley,which is used as a Planned Parenthood training manual that—gasp—offers the message that it is not wrong for us to touch our genitals. “Planned Parenthood’s gateway drug is masturbation,” Hitchborn says.“If a dirty old man showed these pictures to kids in a park, he’d be arrested.” Looking directly at his audience, Hitchborn confides that by showing kids depictions of sex organs, Planned Parenthood is trying to “dispel embarrassment.” Ah, the horror of matter-of-factly presenting oral sex, anal and vaginal penetration, and mutual masturbation as options for healthy sexual expression.

An even more egregious affront to decency, he adds, is the fact that Planned Parenthood treats lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender kids as no more psychologically defective or predatory than heterosexuals. By introducing straight youth to the LGBTQ community, Hitchborn believes Planned Parenthood is intentionally exposing them “to sexual deviancy.” Even more bizarre, he adds that the unmistakable goal of such educational efforts is the “restructuring of the family.” He then concludes that Planned Parenthood’s agenda is little more than “a sick form of population control.”

In the world according to ALL, Planned Parenthood is attempting to turn U.S. youth into sex addicts so it can sell them contraception and abortion while simultaneously working to reduce the number of people in the United States.

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Pat Robertson Supports Birth Control! But Bill O’Reilly Wants Jay Z to Preach Abstinence 
O’Reilly thinks the way to go is peer pressure to discourage young women from getting pregnant, and his big idea is to use Jay Z, whom he describes as the “100 million dollar man,” to exert this pressure.
O’Reilly does have a point buried in his rant. Peer pressure and perception of what peers are doing sexually does, in fact, influence behavior. For example, studies have shown that young people who believe their peers are using condoms are more likely to do so themselves. Research has also found that peer education is often more effective than programs delivered by adults. One such study compared HIV programs led by peers to those led by adults andfound that “peer counselors produced greater attitude changes in teens’ perception of personal risk of HIV infection.”
But a message of “don’t have sex” that seems to be directed almost exclusively at African-American young women is offensive, and, as Carville points out, unlikely to be effective. The federal government already tried promoting abstinence-only-until-marriage to the tune of$176 million per year at its peak, and there is no evidence that it was even remotely effective. In fact, the federal government’s own review of some of the “best” abstinence-only-until-marriage programs concluded:

Findings indicate that youth in the program group were no more likely than control group youth to have abstained from sex and, among those who reported having had sex, they had similar numbers of sexual partners and had initiated sex at the same mean age.

Of course, to O’Reilly’s credit, none of these programs involved Jay Z.

Pat Robertson Supports Birth Control! But Bill O’Reilly Wants Jay Z to Preach Abstinence

O’Reilly thinks the way to go is peer pressure to discourage young women from getting pregnant, and his big idea is to use Jay Z, whom he describes as the “100 million dollar man,” to exert this pressure.

O’Reilly does have a point buried in his rant. Peer pressure and perception of what peers are doing sexually does, in fact, influence behavior. For example, studies have shown that young people who believe their peers are using condoms are more likely to do so themselves. Research has also found that peer education is often more effective than programs delivered by adults. One such study compared HIV programs led by peers to those led by adults andfound that “peer counselors produced greater attitude changes in teens’ perception of personal risk of HIV infection.”

But a message of “don’t have sex” that seems to be directed almost exclusively at African-American young women is offensive, and, as Carville points out, unlikely to be effective. The federal government already tried promoting abstinence-only-until-marriage to the tune of$176 million per year at its peak, and there is no evidence that it was even remotely effective. In fact, the federal government’s own review of some of the “best” abstinence-only-until-marriage programs concluded:

Findings indicate that youth in the program group were no more likely than control group youth to have abstained from sex and, among those who reported having had sex, they had similar numbers of sexual partners and had initiated sex at the same mean age.

Of course, to O’Reilly’s credit, none of these programs involved Jay Z.

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Panel looks at Elizabeth Smart’s recent comments on abstinence-only sex education and whether the policy is effective.

1009feminism:

Wrap it up!

Use condoms, and get tested. It’s easy, and if you do have an STD, it’s best to catch it early.

-Ronny

Get Real! Why Am I Scared to Touch My Own Vagina?

Hey. I’m 14 and I’ve never fingered myself. I’ve done other things, but the thought of fingering myself just seems gross. A couple times, I’ve tried to, but then I get to thinking about how gross vaginas are, and I chicken out. I know this is irrational, but do you have any advice on getting over this? Thanks.

Heather Corinna replies:
Well, I don’t think vaginas or vulvas (or penises or anuses or mouths or ears or eyes or fingers or kidneys—any body parts) are gross. I think they’re really freaking cool and totally fascinating, whether I’m talking or thinking about my own, or all vulvas or vaginas. But you’re making it quite clear that you feel this way, and I wish I knew more about why.
No matter what, you don’t have to ever masturbate or touch yourself in a way that makes you feel uncomfortable. Masturbation is about seeking our own pleasure and comfort with our own bodies, which means that if there’s anything that doesn’t feel pleasurable or comfortable, we don’t have to do it, just like we don’t have to do anything that doesn’t feel physically and emotionally good with a sexual partner. There aren’t right or wrong ways to masturbate or have sex in this regard: just what feels right to the person or people involved. If you don’t want to put your fingers inside your vagina, you don’t have to, just like if you don’t want to touch your elbow you don’t have to, and you don’t have to stick your finger in your nose if you don’t want to do that.
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Get Real! Why Am I Scared to Touch My Own Vagina?

Hey. I’m 14 and I’ve never fingered myself. I’ve done other things, but the thought of fingering myself just seems gross. A couple times, I’ve tried to, but then I get to thinking about how gross vaginas are, and I chicken out. I know this is irrational, but do you have any advice on getting over this? Thanks.

Heather Corinna replies:

Well, I don’t think vaginas or vulvas (or penises or anuses or mouths or ears or eyes or fingers or kidneys—any body parts) are gross. I think they’re really freaking cool and totally fascinating, whether I’m talking or thinking about my own, or all vulvas or vaginas. But you’re making it quite clear that you feel this way, and I wish I knew more about why.

No matter what, you don’t have to ever masturbate or touch yourself in a way that makes you feel uncomfortable. Masturbation is about seeking our own pleasure and comfort with our own bodies, which means that if there’s anything that doesn’t feel pleasurable or comfortable, we don’t have to do it, just like we don’t have to do anything that doesn’t feel physically and emotionally good with a sexual partner. There aren’t right or wrong ways to masturbate or have sex in this regard: just what feels right to the person or people involved. If you don’t want to put your fingers inside your vagina, you don’t have to, just like if you don’t want to touch your elbow you don’t have to, and you don’t have to stick your finger in your nose if you don’t want to do that.

Read more—>