Tell Nike, Inc.: Stop selling products that feature grotesque Native caricatures and offensive slogans on gear for the Cleveland Indians, the Washington football team and Florida State University. SIGN THE PETITION NOW.

Tell Nike, Inc.: Stop selling products that feature grotesque Native caricatures and offensive slogans on gear for the Cleveland Indians, the Washington football team and Florida State University. SIGN THE PETITION NOW.

Join us in telling Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin and the Oklahoma State Legislature to build a real culture of respect for Native Americans: Restore the Indian Affairs Commission, add a Secretary of Native American Affairs to the cabinet, and develop a Native history and cultural curriculum for government employees and public schools. SIGN THE PETITION.
Join us in telling Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin and the Oklahoma State Legislature to build a real culture of respect for Native Americans: Restore the Indian Affairs Commission, add a Secretary of Native American Affairs to the cabinet, and develop a Native history and cultural curriculum for government employees and public schools. SIGN THE PETITION.
Marissa Alexander did not get a chance to see her youngest daughter take her first step. She didn’t get a chance to hear her say her first word, or blow out the candles on her first birthday cake. These and many more memories that mothers are excited to photograph or catch on film weren’t possible for Alexander because she was living behind bars—all because she fired a warning shot in the air, harming no one, to ward off Rico Gray, her abusive estranged husband and the father of her youngest child. Monica Simpson, “Standing Our Ground: Reproductive Justice for Marissa Alexander”
Like so many before it, the outcome of the trial of Michael Dunn for the murder of Jordan Davis reveals how deeply ingrained racism is in this country. Somehow, some way, this must end, and it is up to each of us to end it.

— Jodi Jacobson

Paralysis Is Not an Option: What We Must Do While Mourning Jordan Davis.

When An Obviously Racist ‘Shopping While Black’ Situation is Happening, Who Steps In to Help?

“Shopping While Black” is a faux crime that black people fear committing—along with a whole host of other while-black faux-offenses that are rooted in racism against black people rather than in any real crime or even action—and consists of being black in a store, and thus being treated suspiciously, unwelcomingly, or even hostilely by store staff. Many black people have experienced it at least once in their lives; yet who steps in to help someone being victimized and humiliated by such outright racism in public spaces?

This social experiment, conducted by ABC‘s What Would You Do?, shows the answer to that question in real-life footage. A point to note is that it is not only amazing how few white people step in on the side of justice in this video, but also how surprised the white people that do step in are by racism when it is a fact of life for people of color in America today.

Parents outraged after daughter’s hairstyle not allowed at Deborah Brown Community School

Over the weekend, a public relations firm representing the university issued a statement denying any involvement in the school’s policy by Langston and calling for its immediate change.
“After a discussion between Langston University President Kent Smith and the superintendent of the school, Ms. Deborah Brown, it was mutually agreed that the policy in question should be changed,” the statement reads.
“On Monday, Ms. Brown will propose a policy change to the school’s board during a special meeting. Smith said he supports the change in the policy because it reflects an important value at Langston University to respect the individuality of students.”
Tiana’s parents, Terrance and Miranda Parker, said they think their personal stance on another of the charter school’s policies — spanking students — might also have something to do with how they’ve been treated.
“They act like the kids are their children,” Miranda Parker said. “Maybe that’s OK with other parents, but we are very involved. Very concerned. I wouldn’t sign their waiver. We don’t beat our own kids, so why would we let them?”

Read more: http://bit.ly/17SdEaI 
And keep up the pressure by signing the petition: http://bit.ly/ApologizeToTiana 

Parents outraged after daughter’s hairstyle not allowed at Deborah Brown Community School

Over the weekend, a public relations firm representing the university issued a statement denying any involvement in the school’s policy by Langston and calling for its immediate change.

“After a discussion between Langston University President Kent Smith and the superintendent of the school, Ms. Deborah Brown, it was mutually agreed that the policy in question should be changed,” the statement reads.

“On Monday, Ms. Brown will propose a policy change to the school’s board during a special meeting. Smith said he supports the change in the policy because it reflects an important value at Langston University to respect the individuality of students.”

Tiana’s parents, Terrance and Miranda Parker, said they think their personal stance on another of the charter school’s policies — spanking students — might also have something to do with how they’ve been treated.

“They act like the kids are their children,” Miranda Parker said. “Maybe that’s OK with other parents, but we are very involved. Very concerned. I wouldn’t sign their waiver. We don’t beat our own kids, so why would we let them?”

Read more: http://bit.ly/17SdEaI 

And keep up the pressure by signing the petition: http://bit.ly/ApologizeToTiana 

Eve Ensler Is Wrong That for Women and Trayvon Martin, ‘Our Struggles Are One’

imageIn her open letter to teenage homicide victim Trayvon Martin, whose killer was acquitted on July 14, renowned sexual assault activist Eve Ensler writes, “I am not you. I am not Trayvon Martin. I will never know what it feels like to live in the skin, in the daily rhythms and predeterminations of a black boy or man in America. I will never know what it is like to always be held suspect, to feel categorized from birth as dangerous. But as a woman, there are things I do know and things that I have experienced that bring us into the same story, the same struggle.”

Ensler goes on to explain how she and Martin are alike. For example, she says she knows “what it’s like to be worried about being followed, to speed up my step or slow down and pretend to be casual.” She also says she knows “what it feels like to be attacked or raped and be blamed for it because of what I was wearing (hoodie=short skirt).” Later in her letter, she adds that she’s met many men like Martin’s killer, George Zimmerman, who “are full of a simmering explosive rage, determined by poverty or shame or violence or humiliation or low self esteem.” For that reason, she explains that next year’s One Billion Rising event, an event her V-Day movement created in 2013, will focus on justice for all victims of gender violence. Among other things, the event will encourage people to “rise for an end to guns and Stand Your Ground laws where unarmed 17-year-olds are shot down dead,” writes Ensler. “We will rise to say Justice involves the whole story—the story of race, of class, of gender. Our struggles are one.”

With all due respect to Ensler, I don’t think a letter to Martin was the right place to push an agenda about her campaign to end violence against women, especially without first acknowledging the fear many people are taught to feel about men of color—a fear that is just as present in the women’s movement as it is in each of the United States of America. For many, the case against Zimmerman and his acquittal represented a symptom of the nation’s “unaddressed racism.” Ensler, then, had an opportunity to address this issue of race, particularly in the women’s movement, but she blew it.

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