restlesslyaspiring:

pearlsandink:

Men’s Rights Activists.

OH MY GOD THIS IS A PERFECT REPRESENTATION

LOL. Yes. Let’s everyone take a moment to recognize what life privileges they might have!

(via iamnotafeministtbh)

Our bodies, we keep having to remind people, are not public resources or mobile baby production facilities.

Soraya Chemaly, Bode Miller Changed His Mind And Hurt Pregnant Women’s Rights Along With It

Mainstream media has painted Bode Miller as a dedicated father in a brutal custody battle. But where’s the focus on his attempt to control the life and restrict the rights of a pregnant woman? Nowhere, says Soraya Chemaly.

Data Shows U.S. Workers Want the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act—and More Policies Like It

In a poll of men and women 2012 voters:

90% said they want to achieve pay equity by raising pay for women; 
91% percent said they want to protect pregnant workers and mothers from being fired or demoted; 
and 87% support expanding scholarships for women and parents to get better jobs.

Data Shows U.S. Workers Want the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act—and More Policies Like It

In a poll of men and women 2012 voters:

  • 90% said they want to achieve pay equity by raising pay for women;
  • 91% percent said they want to protect pregnant workers and mothers from being fired or demoted;
  • and 87% support expanding scholarships for women and parents to get better jobs.

In this case Alicia Beltran, a 28-year-old pregnant woman, sought early prenatal care and confided in health care workers about her prior use of painkillers and her efforts to end that use on her own. Instead of commending Ms. Beltran for her progress, she was arrested on July 18, 2013 by Wisconsin law enforcement officials. She was arrested under a Wisconsin law passed in the guise of protecting fertilized eggs, embryos, and fetuses from any pregnant woman who “habitually lacks self-control in the use of alcohol or controlled substances.” According to papers filed with the court, Ms. Beltran was forcibly taken into custody by law enforcement when she was 15 weeks pregnant, put into handcuffs and shackles, and brought to a court hearing. Although a lawyer had already been appointed to represent her fetus, Ms. Beltran had no right to counsel — and therefore had no attorney — at her initial court appearance. Then, without testimony from a single medical expert, the court ordered her to be detained at an inpatient drug treatment program two hours from her home.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women: First Fed Challenge To Pregnant Woman’s Arrest Under “Personhood”-Like Measure

In case there’s any question that “personhood” laws exist exclusively to deny people with uteruses personhood.

(via robot-heart-politics)

Help NAPW successfully defend and free Alicia and show how harmful policies like these are.

(via aspectsofchoice)

Alicia Beltran found herself handcuffed and shackled for being honest and telling a health care provider about her past struggles with addiction. She was taken to a court hearing where a lawyer had already been appointed to represent her fetus. Beltran herself had no right to counsel and was not provided with a court-appointed lawyer.This case could deter those pregnant women who drink any amount of alcohol or who have ever used a controlled substance from seeking prenatal care.
Read more about the case here.
Help National Advocates for Pregnant Women fight for Alicia’s freedom

Alicia Beltran found herself handcuffed and shackled for being honest and telling a health care provider about her past struggles with addiction. She was taken to a court hearing where a lawyer had already been appointed to represent her fetus. Beltran herself had no right to counsel and was not provided with a court-appointed lawyer.

This case could deter those pregnant women who drink any amount of alcohol or who have ever used a controlled substance from seeking prenatal care.

Read more about the case here.

Help National Advocates for Pregnant Women fight for Alicia’s freedom

Greg Zoeller, Indiana’s Attorney General, seems to believe that pregnancy constitutes probable cause to search bodily fluids for drugs despite it being ruled as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court.Women are tired of being treated with suspicion, discriminated against, and having our access to health care tampered with by heavy-handed meddlers who are hell-bent on policing the reproduction and sexuality of strangers.
Sign if you agree that pregnancy should not be treated as a crime

Greg Zoeller, Indiana’s Attorney General, seems to believe that pregnancy constitutes probable cause to search bodily fluids for drugs despite it being ruled as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court.

Women are tired of being treated with suspicion, discriminated against, and having our access to health care tampered with by heavy-handed meddlers who are hell-bent on policing the reproduction and sexuality of strangers.

Sign if you agree that pregnancy should not be treated as a crime

How Long Does Pregnancy Last, Really?

We are all used to the idea that pregnancy lasts nine months, though some of us who’ve experienced it are pretty convinced that it lasts much, much longer than that. The medical community has long said that the average pregnancy lasts 40 weeks—though the clock starts ticking at the start of a woman’s last menstrual cycle before conception, not the day of conception or the day of implantation. New research suggests that there is a lot more variation in the total number of days a woman is pregnant than we may have thought.

Researchers followed 125 women who were trying to get pregnant. Through urinalysis they were able to tell when these women ovulated—which was presumed to be the day of conception, since eggs only last about 24 hours—and the day the embryo implanted.

After excluding those babies who were born pre-term, the researchers still found a high variation in the length of pregnancy, ranging from 35 to 40 weeks from the day of conception to the day of birth or about 38 to 43 weeks from the day of a woman’s last menstrual period.

Though the researchers say this variation is surprising and may change how practitioners determine and explain due dates, some obstetricians say this is nothing new. Dr. Tomer Singer, a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, for example, told LiveScience that he already tells women they could expect their pregnancies to last anywhere from 37 to 42 weeks (using last menstrual cycle as the start date). The study was also small and limited to women who were not having fertility issues.