BREAKING: SCOTUS rejected attempts to revive Arizona’s 20-week abortion ban.

It’s Not a Sin to Use Birth Control—It’s a Sin to Impede Access to Birth Control

It’s Not a Sin to Use Birth Control—It’s a Sin to Impede Access to Birth Control

It is not just sexual assault survivors who need their abortion covered. Yes, there is an added dimension of cruelty when you’re talking about denying women who get pregnant as a result of rape care and coverage. But we cannot create a hierarchy of “good” and “bad” abortions. Or of “deserving” women. One in three American women will have an abortion, and the circumstances behind that pregnancy is none of our business—and it certainly should have no bearing on whether or not women can afford to access care. — Jessica Valenti, Please Don’t Call it ‘Rape Insurance’: Michigan’s Anti-Choice Bill Hurts All Women

On Abortion, the People Keep Speaking. Is Anyone Listening?

The defeat of the 20-week abortion ban in Albuquerque underscores a critical but often overlooked point in abortion politics: When given the chance, voters have consistently rejected the anti-choice agenda. In South Dakota, voters have twice overwhelmingly defeated anti-choice ballot initiatives promoting abortion bans. And in Colorado, voters have twice dismissed so-called personhood laws that would have banned abortions and most forms of birth control. Another personhood ballot initiative was defeated in Mississippi by a margin of 57 to 43 percent.

Consistent rejection by actual voters of attempts to give the state control over women’s bodies tells us three things. One, polls that attempt to divide people into neat boxes such as “pro-choice” and “pro-life” or to measure support for hypothetical restrictions on abortion in generic terms do not reflect how people really feel about safe abortion care. In fact, when asked specifically about who should make decisions on how and when to bear children and under what circumstances to terminate a pregnancy, voters make clear they do not want to interfere in the deeply personal decisions they believe belong between a woman, her partner and family, and her medical advisers, even in cases of later abortion. In short, voters do not want legislators playing god or doctor.

beyondxy:

36 Years of the Hyde Amendment

beyondxy:

36 Years of the Hyde Amendment

Former Texas Rep. Wayne Christian, who tried to get LGBT/women’s centers banned from public schools, is touting his strong record against abortion …. while running for railroad commissioner.

Former Texas Rep. Wayne Christian, who tried to get LGBT/women’s centers banned from public schools, is touting his strong record against abortion …. while running for railroad commissioner.

Women have been having abortions since time immemorial. The criminalization of abortion, however, is a more recent phenomenon, dating back to the 19th century, and supported by patriarchal social norms linked to female domesticity and motherhood, and a desire to control female sexuality. In Our Own Hands: What U.S. Women Can Learn from Self-Use of Medication Abortion Worldwide