Pat Robertson Supports Birth Control! But Bill O’Reilly Wants Jay Z to Preach Abstinence 
O’Reilly thinks the way to go is peer pressure to discourage young women from getting pregnant, and his big idea is to use Jay Z, whom he describes as the “100 million dollar man,” to exert this pressure.
O’Reilly does have a point buried in his rant. Peer pressure and perception of what peers are doing sexually does, in fact, influence behavior. For example, studies have shown that young people who believe their peers are using condoms are more likely to do so themselves. Research has also found that peer education is often more effective than programs delivered by adults. One such study compared HIV programs led by peers to those led by adults andfound that “peer counselors produced greater attitude changes in teens’ perception of personal risk of HIV infection.”
But a message of “don’t have sex” that seems to be directed almost exclusively at African-American young women is offensive, and, as Carville points out, unlikely to be effective. The federal government already tried promoting abstinence-only-until-marriage to the tune of$176 million per year at its peak, and there is no evidence that it was even remotely effective. In fact, the federal government’s own review of some of the “best” abstinence-only-until-marriage programs concluded:

Findings indicate that youth in the program group were no more likely than control group youth to have abstained from sex and, among those who reported having had sex, they had similar numbers of sexual partners and had initiated sex at the same mean age.

Of course, to O’Reilly’s credit, none of these programs involved Jay Z.

Pat Robertson Supports Birth Control! But Bill O’Reilly Wants Jay Z to Preach Abstinence

O’Reilly thinks the way to go is peer pressure to discourage young women from getting pregnant, and his big idea is to use Jay Z, whom he describes as the “100 million dollar man,” to exert this pressure.

O’Reilly does have a point buried in his rant. Peer pressure and perception of what peers are doing sexually does, in fact, influence behavior. For example, studies have shown that young people who believe their peers are using condoms are more likely to do so themselves. Research has also found that peer education is often more effective than programs delivered by adults. One such study compared HIV programs led by peers to those led by adults andfound that “peer counselors produced greater attitude changes in teens’ perception of personal risk of HIV infection.”

But a message of “don’t have sex” that seems to be directed almost exclusively at African-American young women is offensive, and, as Carville points out, unlikely to be effective. The federal government already tried promoting abstinence-only-until-marriage to the tune of$176 million per year at its peak, and there is no evidence that it was even remotely effective. In fact, the federal government’s own review of some of the “best” abstinence-only-until-marriage programs concluded:

Findings indicate that youth in the program group were no more likely than control group youth to have abstained from sex and, among those who reported having had sex, they had similar numbers of sexual partners and had initiated sex at the same mean age.

Of course, to O’Reilly’s credit, none of these programs involved Jay Z.

For many of us it’s always seemed the threats to our rights were constantly looming, even in moments of victory the opposition was omnipresent—chipping away slowly at our rights until they completely eliminate them. Now, what was always a bad situation has become a catastrophe.
 
Let’s be candid about what 2013 has brought so far. It’s a war on women targeted to those most at-risk: the women with the fewest personal resources are pushed furthest toward the brink.


By gutting funds for family planning, Medicaid, cervical and breast cancer prevention, maternity care and infant and child health resources, the radical right is not simply reducing but eliminating access to safe abortion care as well as all forms of primary and preventive health care critical to the health of women, infants, and children 
 
We’re hearing about stories of women going to the edge literally just to access care: unable to access reliable contraception; risking their lives with pills doled out at flea markets; fleeing the country to get an abortion. In short, they are being forced to endanger their own lives and their families’ future in the process of getting basic health care, and to make profoundly personal choices about whether and when to bear a child.

Tell us about your experience accessing reproductive health care and what it means for your life and your community.
For many of us it’s always seemed the threats to our rights were constantly looming, even in moments of victory the opposition was omnipresent—chipping away slowly at our rights until they completely eliminate them. Now, what was always a bad situation has become a catastrophe.
 
Let’s be candid about what 2013 has brought so far. It’s a war on women targeted to those most at-risk: the women with the fewest personal resources are pushed furthest toward the brink.
By gutting funds for family planning, Medicaid, cervical and breast cancer prevention, maternity care and infant and child health resources, the radical right is not simply reducing but eliminating access to safe abortion care as well as all forms of primary and preventive health care critical to the health of women, infants, and children 
 
We’re hearing about stories of women going to the edge literally just to access care: unable to access reliable contraception; risking their lives with pills doled out at flea markets; fleeing the country to get an abortion. In short, they are being forced to endanger their own lives and their families’ future in the process of getting basic health care, and to make profoundly personal choices about whether and when to bear a child.

Tell us about your experience accessing reproductive health care and what it means for your life and your community.

Click here or the image to donate! All donations made today, Tuesday, June 25th, 2013, will go to the people’s filibuster!
Don’t know what’s going on in Texas? Read about the filibuster here.

Click here or the image to donate! All donations made today, Tuesday, June 25th, 2013, will go to the people’s filibuster!

Don’t know what’s going on in Texas? Read about the filibuster here.

Texas Consolidates its Most Horrifying Anti-Choice Bills Into One Nightmare Piece of Legislation 
Republican Gov. Rick Perry called the 30-day special session this month to address Texas’ redistricting issues, as he and his fellow Republicans fight to prevent the state’s growing minority populations from receiving the democratic representation they’re due; a federal court struck down state and federal district maps drawn in 2011, declaring them discriminatory.
But this week, Perry added a sweeping anti-choice bill to the legislature’s agenda: SB 5, filed by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy), combines the worst of anti-choice legislators’ proposed abortion bills from the regular session into a nightmarish document that would decimate Texans’ access to safe, legal abortion care. If passed in its entirety, SB 5 would:
ban all abortions after 20 weeks, with the exception of those “necessary to avert the death or substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant woman” or if a fetal anomaly “will result in the death of the infant not later than minutes to hours after birth regardless of the provision of lifesaving medical treatment.”
require all abortion-providing doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the procedure is performed.
effectively ban telemedical abortions, requiring doctors to provide the abortion pill (a mifepristol/mifepristone combination) in person and according to outdated 13-year-old Food and Drug Administration regulations that are not only unnecessary, but thought to be potentially harmful in current practice, according to the American College of Gynecologists and the Texas Medical Association.
require all abortion providers to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, which would reduce the number of sites at which a Texan can obtain an abortion to a total of five, located solely in major metropolitan areas.

Texas Consolidates its Most Horrifying Anti-Choice Bills Into One Nightmare Piece of Legislation

Republican Gov. Rick Perry called the 30-day special session this month to address Texas’ redistricting issues, as he and his fellow Republicans fight to prevent the state’s growing minority populations from receiving the democratic representation they’re due; a federal court struck down state and federal district maps drawn in 2011, declaring them discriminatory.

But this week, Perry added a sweeping anti-choice bill to the legislature’s agenda: SB 5, filed by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy), combines the worst of anti-choice legislators’ proposed abortion bills from the regular session into a nightmarish document that would decimate Texans’ access to safe, legal abortion care. If passed in its entirety, SB 5 would:

  • ban all abortions after 20 weeks, with the exception of those “necessary to avert the death or substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant woman” or if a fetal anomaly “will result in the death of the infant not later than minutes to hours after birth regardless of the provision of lifesaving medical treatment.”
  • require all abortion-providing doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the procedure is performed.
  • effectively ban telemedical abortions, requiring doctors to provide the abortion pill (a mifepristol/mifepristone combination) in person and according to outdated 13-year-old Food and Drug Administration regulations that are not only unnecessary, but thought to be potentially harmful in current practice, according to the American College of Gynecologists and the Texas Medical Association.
  • require all abortion providers to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, which would reduce the number of sites at which a Texan can obtain an abortion to a total of five, located solely in major metropolitan areas.
Branstad to Approve Medicaid Abortion Cases Individually, Says He’ll Be ‘Thoughtful’
Iowa’s anti-choice Republican governor announced Friday that he expects to sign the state’s budget into law, including a new rule that will give him complete control over federal Medicaid funding for the roughly two dozen Medicaid-eligible abortions that are performed in the state each year.

Branstad to Approve Medicaid Abortion Cases Individually, Says He’ll Be ‘Thoughtful’

Iowa’s anti-choice Republican governor announced Friday that he expects to sign the state’s budget into law, including a new rule that will give him complete control over federal Medicaid funding for the roughly two dozen Medicaid-eligible abortions that are performed in the state each year.

"I don’t want to die," Beatriz told the New York Times this week. The lupus-stricken, 22 year old mother’s doctors have said that continuing her pregnancy is highly likely to kill her. That wasn’t good enough for the Supreme Court of El Salvador, who’ve now denied her a life-saving abortion, as we reported last night. Allies and well-wishers from around the world are rallying to support her and her family in this struggle, while searching for other ways to get her to doctors who can treat her without facing murder charges. Tens of thousands of women die every year because of outright abortion bans like the one in El Salvador. Usually when we hear about one of these cases, like Savita’s in Ireland, we are sad, we are angry, and we promise to keep fighting in the memory of yet another woman killed by cruelty and ignorance.We don’t want to have to remember Beatriz. We want her to get well and get on with her life. We know you do, too.

"I don’t want to die," Beatriz told the New York Times this week. The lupus-stricken, 22 year old mother’s doctors have said that continuing her pregnancy is highly likely to kill her. That wasn’t good enough for the Supreme Court of El Salvador, who’ve now denied her a life-saving abortion, as we reported last night.

Allies and well-wishers from around the world are rallying to support her and her family in this struggle, while searching for other ways to get her to doctors who can treat her without facing murder charges.

Tens of thousands of women die every year because of outright abortion bans like the one in El Salvador. Usually when we hear about one of these cases, like Savita’s in Ireland, we are sad, we are angry, and we promise to keep fighting in the memory of yet another woman killed by cruelty and ignorance.

We don’t want to have to remember Beatriz. We want her to get well and get on with her life. We know you do, too.

cosumosu:

Project for one of my classes @w@;)

(via satinalia-deactivated20140411)