If socioeconomic status is a primary driver of academic performance, and if student achievement suffers in high-poverty schools, why do we continue to organize schools in a way that predetermines some for failure and then blame teachers? — John Savage, I taught at the worst school in Texas
Retailers Turn Thanksgiving Into Black Thursday

There are more than 16 million retail workers in the U.S. according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and this year many big-name stores have asked them to work through the Thanksgiving holiday. It seems Black Friday has now become Black Thursday, and at least a dozen stores are opening their doors in the middle of turkey day.

Those working on Thanksgiving are likely to be working part-time for low wages, and despite their low income many are also the primary earners in their households. Here’s a look at who decided to stay open this year, and a snapshot of who’s likely working this Thanksgiving.

Retailers Turn Thanksgiving Into Black Thursday

There are more than 16 million retail workers in the U.S. according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and this year many big-name stores have asked them to work through the Thanksgiving holiday. It seems Black Friday has now become Black Thursday, and at least a dozen stores are opening their doors in the middle of turkey day.

Those working on Thanksgiving are likely to be working part-time for low wages, and despite their low income many are also the primary earners in their households. Here’s a look at who decided to stay open this year, and a snapshot of who’s likely working this Thanksgiving.

beyondxy:

36 Years of the Hyde Amendment

beyondxy:

36 Years of the Hyde Amendment

"Poor People Do Not Deserve to Have Children"

In our current economy, you can work more than one job and still not make ends meet. Just ask McDonald’s, the giant corporation that counsels its employees to have more than one job and, funny enough, to apply for food stamps to make ends meet. McDonald’s made $5.5 billion in profit in 2012, more than enough to pay their workers a living wage. Our economic system takes the benefits of the work of many to enrich the few.

As Demos’ Senior Fellow, Sasha Abramsky, who wrote, The American Way of Povertystates:

50 million Americans, nearly, are now so impoverished that they cannot feed themselves without government assistance. It’s the single greatest commonly shared story in contemporary America. It’s the experience of economic insecurity.

The greatest commonly shared story in this country is economic insecurity. If you think poor people don’t deserve to have children, the problem is not SNAP or the people that rely on it to survive. The problem is you.

Read the whole post here.

Crushed by the Cost of Child Care 

The difficulty of obtaining good, affordable day care is well known as a problem afflicting the working poor. But increasingly, middle- and upper-middle-class parents are finding that day care is hard to find or access and that even when it is available it is startlingly costly. Among the mothers I spoke to, one sent her daughter to a day care proprietor where the owner secretly had another woman mind all eight babies all day long; another signed up for a slot at a local day care when she was newly pregnant. Her daughter is now 5, and she is still on the wait list.
The cost and the scarcity of day care has helped create what the sociologist Joya Misra calls “the motherhood penalty.” While women without children are closer to pay equity with men, women with children are lagging behind because they find that working doesn’t always make sense after considering the cost of child care. When women earn less than their partners, they are more likely to drop out of the work force, and if they do so for two years or more, they may not be able to get back in at anything approaching their prior job or earnings. The cost of taking care of one’s children outside the home is now so high that many women cannot be assured of both working and making a decent income after taxes and child care costs.
Professor Misra, who teaches sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has analyzed data from thousands of parents from different social classes. One study of middle-class academic parents was based on hundreds of surveys and focus group interviews and 17 one-on-one interviews. Many talked about the shock of day care costs, which can eat up 30 percent of one income in a two-salary couple, Professor Misra says.In 35 states and D.C., even the cost of center-based day care (let alone a nanny) is higher than the cost of a year of a public college. More anecdotally, day care costs for middle-class New Yorkers can easily equal from $25,000 to $30,000 per child. In New York, child care is the single greatest expense among low-income families in the city, surpassing both food and housing.
And it’s not just New York City. Ainsley Stapleton, 36, an accountant based in Arlington, Va., describes herself as middle class. But with three children, all of whom are in preschool or day care, she calculates that she spends 87.6 percent of her take-home pay on day care.
“It makes me want to cry a little,” Ms. Stapleton said by phone from her office. In the past, she said, she and her husband have bounced around the question of whether “he should quit or I should, but both of us enjoy working.”

Crushed by the Cost of Child Care

The difficulty of obtaining good, affordable day care is well known as a problem afflicting the working poor. But increasingly, middle- and upper-middle-class parents are finding that day care is hard to find or access and that even when it is available it is startlingly costly. Among the mothers I spoke to, one sent her daughter to a day care proprietor where the owner secretly had another woman mind all eight babies all day long; another signed up for a slot at a local day care when she was newly pregnant. Her daughter is now 5, and she is still on the wait list.

The cost and the scarcity of day care has helped create what the sociologist Joya Misra calls “the motherhood penalty.” While women without children are closer to pay equity with men, women with children are lagging behind because they find that working doesn’t always make sense after considering the cost of child care. When women earn less than their partners, they are more likely to drop out of the work force, and if they do so for two years or more, they may not be able to get back in at anything approaching their prior job or earnings. The cost of taking care of one’s children outside the home is now so high that many women cannot be assured of both working and making a decent income after taxes and child care costs.

Professor Misra, who teaches sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has analyzed data from thousands of parents from different social classes. One study of middle-class academic parents was based on hundreds of surveys and focus group interviews and 17 one-on-one interviews. Many talked about the shock of day care costs, which can eat up 30 percent of one income in a two-salary couple, Professor Misra says.In 35 states and D.C., even the cost of center-based day care (let alone a nanny) is higher than the cost of a year of a public college. More anecdotally, day care costs for middle-class New Yorkers can easily equal from $25,000 to $30,000 per child. In New York, child care is the single greatest expense among low-income families in the city, surpassing both food and housing.

And it’s not just New York City. Ainsley Stapleton, 36, an accountant based in Arlington, Va., describes herself as middle class. But with three children, all of whom are in preschool or day care, she calculates that she spends 87.6 percent of her take-home pay on day care.

“It makes me want to cry a little,” Ms. Stapleton said by phone from her office. In the past, she said, she and her husband have bounced around the question of whether “he should quit or I should, but both of us enjoy working.”

All Above All unites organizations and individuals to build support for lifting bans that deny abortion coverage. Our vision is to restore public insurance coverage so that every woman, however much she makes, can get affordable, safe abortion care when she needs it.
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All Above All unites organizations and individuals to build support for lifting bans that deny abortion coverage. Our vision is to restore public insurance coverage so that every woman, however much she makes, can get affordable, safe abortion care when she needs it.

Join Us.