Certainly, if the right wing can frame contraception as a “lifestyle” choice, like watching porn or using sex toys, then it becomes much easier to strip away insurance coverage or federal subsidies to make contraception more affordable, all while playing dumb and pretending they’re not trying to take people’s contraception away.

Can this framing take hold? It’s an open question. On the one hand, more than 99 percent of sexually active women have used contraception at some point in their life, and 62 percent of women of reproductive age are currently using a contraceptive method. That level of ubiquity, plus the undeniable fact that pregnancy is a major medical event, makes it hard to imagine that the right could get very far with the attempt to kill our current understanding of contraception as a health-care decision and instead get people to think of it as a “lifestyle” choice.

Of course, abortion is also really common. It’s rare compared to contraception, which many women take on a continuous basis, but about one-third of women will have an abortion in her lifetime. Yet abortion is treated as far rarer and more marginalized than it is, with quite a few people not even realizing how many women they know who have had one. Women who have abortions usually don’t talk about it with most people in their lives; conservatives were able to shame and demonize women who have abortions to the point where such discussions are incredibly hard to have. Most of the discourse about abortion deals with the politics of it, rather than the experience of it. Because of all this, abortion has been successfully marginalized in health care, not covered by government insurance, and understood by most people to be a medical experience separate from your everyday health care.

It’s clear this is what the right is trying to do with contraception, and they have a potent weapon to do it: sexual shame. 

[via Amanda Marcotte

plannedparenthood:

Using two methods of birth control, like the pill+condoms, is the BEST protection from pregnancy AND STDs. Better to be double safe than double sorry!

This should have been a Valentine!

plannedparenthood:

Using two methods of birth control, like the pill+condoms, is the BEST protection from pregnancy AND STDs. Better to be double safe than double sorry!

This should have been a Valentine!

(via alabamaasrj)

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 


Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

The Vatican has sent out a survey asking national bishops’ conferences around the world 38 questions designed to determine how they and their parishioners feel about contraception, same-sex marriage, divorce, and premarital sex.

The Vatican has sent out a survey asking national bishops’ conferences around the world 38 questions designed to determine how they and their parishioners feel about contraception, same-sex marriage, divorce, and premarital sex.

Defunding Planned Parenthood hurts. Texas launched a new Women’s Health Program this year and so far it has seen its service numbers plummet without the involvement of Planned Parenthood, which historically saw about half of all Women’s Health Program patients.
According to preliminary data provided by the Texas HHSC, current enrollment in TWHP is estimated to be about 97,000 clients, the lowest number of enrollees since September 2009, when the program was just two-and-a-half years old. This July, the TWHP counted over 10,000 fewer enrollees than it did in the same month last year. Add this to the fact that, according to the University of Texas’ Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TPEP), more than 60 family planning clinics in Texas—most of which were not Planned Parenthood facilities—have closed since 2011 due to family planning funding cuts, and it’s clear that there’s a serious, and growing, hole in Texas’ reproductive health safety net.
Read more—>

Defunding Planned Parenthood hurts. Texas launched a new Women’s Health Program this year and so far it has seen its service numbers plummet without the involvement of Planned Parenthood, which historically saw about half of all Women’s Health Program patients.

According to preliminary data provided by the Texas HHSC, current enrollment in TWHP is estimated to be about 97,000 clients, the lowest number of enrollees since September 2009, when the program was just two-and-a-half years old. This July, the TWHP counted over 10,000 fewer enrollees than it did in the same month last year. Add this to the fact that, according to the University of Texas’ Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TPEP), more than 60 family planning clinics in Texas—most of which were not Planned Parenthood facilities—have closed since 2011 due to family planning funding cuts, and it’s clear that there’s a serious, and growing, hole in Texas’ reproductive health safety net.

Read more—>

On June 7, 1965, in Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court legalized contraception (for married people, at least) and held that women and men have the right to privacy in making decisions about their sexual health. The case recognized, in law, the principle that women and men—not government—should decide when and how to plan their families, and paved the way for programs and policies that help women make health-care decisions that affect their educational opportunities, their professional work, and their families.

On June 7, 1965, in Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court legalized contraception (for married people, at least) and held that women and men have the right to privacy in making decisions about their sexual health. The case recognized, in law, the principle that women and men—not government—should decide when and how to plan their families, and paved the way for programs and policies that help women make health-care decisions that affect their educational opportunities, their professional work, and their families.