What Is the Goal of the Doula Movement?
It’s clear that the growing number of doulas in the United States have begun to significantly change the maternity care landscape. While many doulas still have struggles with doctors and hospitals and the medical system’s acceptance of their role, many more are finding providers to be willing partners who understand through patient demands and a growing body of scientific research that doulas improve the birth experience. But a question that came up at a recent university talk, and one I’ve been thinking about for years now, is: What is the end goal of the doula movement? What are we working toward? Many doulas would likely say—and I would have been among them just a few years ago—that the end goal is to have a doula at every birth. But I no longer believe that’s the right goal.

What Is the Goal of the Doula Movement?

It’s clear that the growing number of doulas in the United States have begun to significantly change the maternity care landscape. While many doulas still have struggles with doctors and hospitals and the medical system’s acceptance of their role, many more are finding providers to be willing partners who understand through patient demands and a growing body of scientific research that doulas improve the birth experience. But a question that came up at a recent university talk, and one I’ve been thinking about for years now, is: What is the end goal of the doula movement? What are we working toward? Many doulas would likely say—and I would have been among them just a few years ago—that the end goal is to have a doula at every birth. But I no longer believe that’s the right goal.

Hyperemesis is Serious Business, Whether You’re a Princess or a Pauper

Written by Editor-in-Chief Jodi Jacobson for RH Reality Check. This diary is cross-posted; commenters wishing to engage directly with the author should do so at the original post.

As you might imagine, virtually every news outlet still located on planet Earth has covered the fact that Princess Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, is officially pregnant. A feeding frenzy of press coverage on the royal pregnancy has been virtually guaranteed since the day she and Prince William got engaged.

But unlike those princesses in the fairy tales, Princess Kate’s pregnancy is so far neither easy nor uneventful. An announcement from the Royal Family stated that she was hospitalized with hyperemesis gravidarum, which the American Pregnancy Association explains as “a condition characterized by severe nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and electrolyte disturbance. Mild cases are treated with dietary changes, rest and antacids. More severe cases often require a stay in the hospital so that the mother can receive fluid and nutrition through an intravenous line (IV).”

Major news organizations are not widely known for their effective treatment of women’s health issues, and so it’s not been surprising to me that many have reported Kate is suffering with a “bad case of morning sickness.” Others have been downright rude and ignorant. Gawker’s Caity Weaver, for example, wrote that “hyperemesis gravidarum [is] what they call regular old morning sickness when you are a princess.”

I beg to differ.

Read the rest here.